We’re not even half done

MuHuE has gotten some well-placed criticism from our visitors over the years about our choice of location. “Why Earth,” some ask. At first blush, the Roberts Foundation chose Earth because of the intent of the museum: to showcase human achievements throughout our species’ vast 50000 year history on humanity’s planet of origin.

But there’s another point often cited as a detractor for our choice of planet: Earth is currently about a third of the way through a minor ice age.

Based on the best data Foundation climatologists could bring us, the current cooling event is due to peak about 15000 years from now, around 65000 HE, and slowly warm until the subsequent warming event peaks around 105000 HE, 55000 years from now. This differs from the last major ice age, which lasted approximately two million years and ended at the beginning of the Holocene Era, for which our dating system is named, in part due to the rise of H. sapiens as a dominate animal, but also partly for the beginning of a new era for the planet.

Why even bring that up, one might ask? According to extensive research into the media history of our species, our team has found that there was, during no fewer than three separate points in history spread across about four thousand years, a large percentage of humans who either did not believe that the world climate could change due to human activity, or took no action to mitigate what damage they’d done through participation in their society. Obviously, through thousands of years of observation and experimentation, species’ do have impacts on their ecology, but this idea seems lost on the humans of the early and middle information age.

This brings us to today, to an all but deserted world full of archaeological treasures and serving little more than as a tourist destination for humans seeking to rediscover their ancestral home. The Roberts Foundation and the Smith Museum of Human Experience chose Earth for its rich history and proximity to almost the entire pageant of the human experience. Whether our visitors come to the main museum in the Damascus Arcology, or take part of our global tours, or just stop off while on route to destinations unknown, MuHuE is here to glorify and study our shared history.

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